December 26, 2008

Bob and Thea Pyle with dwarf Agraulis vanillae Koko Crater, Oahu. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Bob and Thea Pyle with dwarf Agraulis vanillae at Koko Crater, Oahu. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Bob Pyle stalking Zizina otis on Waikiki, Oahu. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Bob Pyle stalking Zizina otis on Waikiki, Oahu. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Dorsal view of male Chinese Swallowtail (Papilio xuthus) at Kailua-Kona, photo by Jim Snyder.

Dorsal view of male Chinese Swallowtail (Papilio xuthus) at Kailua-Kona, photo by Jim Snyder.

Hawaiian Blue (Vaga blackburni) at Mana Place on Honolulu, Oahu, photo by Jim Snyder.

Hawaiian Blue (Vaga blackburni) at Mana Place on Honolulu, Oahu, photo by Jim Snyder.

Dorsal view of male Lesser Grass-Blue (Zizina otis) at Waikiki, Hawaii. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Dorsal view of male Lesser Grass-Blue (Zizina otis) at Waikiki, Hawaii. Photo by Jim Snyder.

Larval tents of banana skipper (Erionota thrax) in Kaua'i lowlands.

Larval tents of banana skipper (Erionota thrax) in Kauai. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Koke'e naturalist Laura Arnold shows RMP a native Hawai'ian mint.

Koke'e naturalist Laura Arnold shows RMP a native Hawai'ian mint. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

View of Napali Coast from Kalalau Lookout, with Kalalau Valley (rich in native plants) and beach in background; in foreground, red-flowered ohia trees, on which Blackburn's (= Hawai'ian) blues were nectaring.

View of Napali Coast from Kalalau Lookout, with Kalalau Valley (rich in native plants) and beach in background; in foreground, red-flowered ohia trees, on which Blackburn's blues (=Hawaiian) were nectaring. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Falls at the head of Manoa Valley, Lyon Arboretum, where we encountered the Greater Lantana Butterfly.

Falls at the head of Manoa Valley, Lyon Arboretum, where we encountered the Greater Lantana Butterfly. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Butterflies in the Mist, Halelau, Koke'e, Kau'ai

Butterflies in the Mist, Halelau, Koke'e, Kau'ai. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Butterflies in the Mist, Halelau, Koke'e, Kau'aiButterflies in the Mist, Halelau, Koke’e, Kau’ai. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.
Bob writing up notes at night with help from Laura's assistant

Bob writing up notes at night with help from Laura's assistant. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Tiki Torch butterfly net, net furled; perhaps the only tiki torch ever to make it through airport security.

Tiki Torch butterfly net, net furled; perhaps the only tiki torch ever to make it through airport security. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Welcome Back Snowman.

Welcome Back Snowman. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

Christmas with Grandson Francis.

Christmas with Grandson Francis. Photo by Thea Linnaea Pyle.

TLP & RMP, back from Hawai'i: this thing's almost over!

TLP & RMP, back from Hawaii. Photo by Dorothea Hellyer.


 

The Xerces Society » News

[VIDEO] Western Bumblebee no longer in Willamette Valley

Though Oregon may be experiencing a population boom, there is at least one group that is no longer found anywhere in the Willamette Valley.

The Western Bumblebee.

“Western Bumblebee used to be one of the 3 most common species in Oregon,” said Sarina Jepsen of the Xerces Society in Portland. “It’s really declined dramatically and is no longer in the Willamette Valley where it was most common.”

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt is working on a film about protecting native bees: “A Ghost in the Making: Searching for the Rusty-patched Bumblebee.”

That is one of the 4000 native bees quickly disappearing in the United States.

“It is clearly on an extinction trajectory, the science supports that, the entire bee research community is in agreement,” Bolt told KOIN 6 News. “It’s not just this one species, it’s many many other species that will, too.”

Bolt’s work is part of the first to draw attention to our declining bee problem. Bees tare wildly important in Oregon and all of the US for pollinating.

“There are certainly many in the Western US that are in need of conservation, attention and protection,” Jepsen said.

Late last year, US Fish and Wildlife agreed to consider the Rusty-patched Bumblebee for protection under the Endangered Species Act — but so far, no other steps have been taken.

This post originally appeared at: http://koin.com/2016/06/27/western-bumblebee-no-longer-in-willamette-valley/

 

Note: The Xerces Society is not responsible for the content of external sites.  Where trade names appear, no discrimination is intended, and no endorsement by the Xerces Society is implied.

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Groups seek to protect rare butterfly whose only home is San Juan Island

San Juan Island is the only home to the island marble butterfly. Populations of the species disappeared from Canadian islands in the 1900’s and were rediscovered on San Juan Island in 1998. The species has suffered further decline since rediscovery and faces limited protections.

In the grasslands on south San Juan Island, several patches of bright yellow flowers are fenced off from the rest of the landscape.

The flowering plants are considered weeds by many, but to the island marble butterfly, they’re imperative to the species’ survival. This landscape is the only place the shrinking island marble butterfly population is known to remain, the Skagit Valley Herald reports.

“The populations have constricted pretty dramatically to the point that this is the only home of this butterfly on the Earth,” Ted Thomas of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service said while walking through the American Camp portion of San Juan Island National Historical Park.

For about 15 years, various groups have fought for the butterfly to receive federal Endangered Species Act protection. On April 4, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service deemed the butterfly a candidate species.

That means the species qualifies for protection, but the agency does not have the resources to complete the listing process, which can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, according to a notice in the Federal Register.

Naming the island marble butterfly a candidate species is not good enough for some.

“I was very surprised by their decision,” said Scott Hoffman Black of the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, which has twice sought protection for the butterfly. “There is really one secure population left of this animal on the planet. It is much more endangered than many species that are listed.”

Continue Reading: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2016/06/groups_seek_to_protect_rare_bu.html#incart_river_home

 

Note: The Xerces Society is not responsible for the content of external sites.  Where trade names appear, no discrimination is intended, and no endorsement by the The Xerces Society is implied.


LA Times: 6 easy ways you can help save the bees

Busy as a bee is an accurate statement.

According to the Xerces Society, a nonprofit organization working to protect bees, 75% of the world’s food crop depends on at least one pollinator, such as the honeybee. (California’s pollinator-dependent crop value is about $12 billion a year.)

That’s a lot riding on the journey of the humble bee and its pollinator friends.

Although bee populations have been pummeled by their share of difficulties in the last few years including habitat loss and the over-use of pesticides, there is something simple you can do to help:  plant bee-friendly plants, says Janet Andrews of Backyard Bees, an Orange County-based group that rescues, relocates and maintains feral honeybees in Southern California.

“It’s truly as simple as that and fun,” she says. “We can easily all do our share.”

Read the whole story here: http://www.latimes.com/home/la-hm-0604-how-to-plant-a-bee-garden-20160531-snap-story.html

 

Note: The Xerces Society is not responsible for the content of external sites.  Where trade names appear, no discrimination is intended, and no endorsement by the The Xerces Society is implied.