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Conservation Innovation Grant Studies Farming With Native Beneficial Insects

By - Web Manager and Communications Specialist, Web and Communications Specialist

Published on January 13, 2017
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Note: This article was written and published by the USDA NRCS. The original article may be downloaded here: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/PA_NRCSConsumption/download?cid=nrcseprd1288409&ext=pdf

Sheet mulching enhances soil health at Stonewall Farm, Keene, NH. Photo: USDA

The Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG) program is a voluntary program intended to stimulate the development and adoption of innovative conservation approaches and technologies while leveraging Federal investment in environmental enhancement and protection, in conjunction with agricultural production. Under CIG, Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) funds are used to award competitive grants to non-Federal governmental or non-governmental organizations, Tribes, or individuals, requiring a 50-50 match between the agency and the applicant.

CIG enables NRCS to work with other public and private entities to accelerate technology transfer and adoption of promising technologies and approaches to address some of the nation’s most pressing natural resource concerns. CIG will benefit agricultural producers by providing more options for environmental enhancement and compliance with Federal, State, and local regulations. The NRCS administers CIG.

Insectary strips attract beneficial insects at Wingate Farm, Hinsdale, NH. Photo: USDA

The Xerces Society, partnering with the NH NRCS and the NH Association of Conservation Districts (NHACD), through a CIG, is designing and managing the installation of conservation biological control habitat features on farm sites to protect healthy habitats that provide foods, nests, and shelters for native beneficial insects that prey on crop pests. Nectar, pollen, prey, or foliage, undisturbed soil or hollow/pithy stems, and undisturbed shelter from conservation practices can support populations of biological control agents that consume crop pests, …

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Our blog features posts about conservation written by Xerces Society staff. To see older posts, visit the archive.

Recent Posts:
  • Conservation Innovation Grant Studies Farming With Native Beneficial Insects

  • Rusty Patched Bumble Bee: The First Bee in the Continental US to be Protected Under the Endangered Species Act

  • New Report: How Neonicotinoids Can Kill Bees

  • Western Freshwater Mussels: Unobtrusive, Invaluable—and on the Red List

  • To Save Monarchs, we need More than just Milkweed

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  • Photo: Xerces staff leading a field day at the Lockeford Plant Materials Center in California, Jim Cairns (USDA-NRCS).