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Xerces Society Webinars

 

The Xerces Society hosts webinars and participates in events organized by other organizations. This page lists all the upcoming topics and dates. You can also find updates on our social media and via our enewsletter.

 

Please note that we are accepting remote speaker requests! Depending upon our capacity, we can provide talks through platforms such as Zoom and Google Hangouts. Please fill out our speaker request form here.

 

We also encourage you to subscribe to our YouTube channel. Webinars put on by Xerces will be uploaded here after their stated calendar date, and there are many other resources available on our channel, including the Xerces Classroom Series.

May 26, 2022
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM MST
Santa Fe, New Mexico

What is a pollinator anyway? Learn all about what pollinators are, why it is important to protect them, and how you can create a little patch of pollinator heaven where you live. Discover New Mexico’s rich diversity of native pollinators and the plants they rely on for pollen, nectar and a place to call home. Create a pollinator friendly garden with proper soil treatment, seed-sowing, watering and maintenance and watch how the bees, butterflies, birds and other pollinators show up! Fun for all ages and gardening abilities.

Join Kaitlin Haase and Emily Ruth Spindler for this informative event.

This talk is hosted by Santa Fe Community CollegeClick here to learn more and register.

 

Kaitlin Haase, Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist.

Kaitlin works to create climate-resilient, connected pollinator habitat in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. She collaborates with and educates public and private urban land managers in New Mexico and the desert Southwest on pollinator-friendly practices for landscaping, gardening, and open space restoration.

 

Emily Ruth Spindler, Southwest Pesticide Program Specialist

Emily Ruth will soon receive her Master of Science in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia, where she studied the risk of butterfly host plant contamination with neonicotinoid pesticides downslope of ag fields and toxicity to painted lady caterpillars. She hopes to spread awareness of the pesticide paradigm, explore less toxic pest management options for southwestern working landscapes, and encourage their adoption in agricultural and urban areas.

 

May 26
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM PT
Webinar

This workshop is a companion to our Bumble Bee Atlas workshop trainings (pnwBumbleBeeAtlas.org and caBumbleBeeAtlas.org). While the workshops for those projects are generally focused on training volunteers how and why to participate, many volunteers are excited to learn more about the specifics about bumble bee identification. We've heard you! As such, for the first time, we will focus an entire workshop on identification, taking the time to introduce you to each species and the details we think will help you to identify them. Xerces Society staff members Leif Richardson and Rich Hatfield will co-teach this webinar. Together, they'll share their bumble bee identification expertise, and take you on a tour of the bumble bees of the West Coast (including Idaho). This bumble bee ID course will be geared toward community science volunteers for our Bumble Bee Atlas Projects, but we welcome anyone hoping to learn more about the bumble bees of our region.

Click here for more information and to register.

 

 

Rich Hatfield

Senior Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Bumble Bee Conservation Lead - The Xerces Society

Rich is a senior conservation biologist for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and has been leading the Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas since 2018. He has authored several publications on bumble bees, including a set of management guidelines entitled Conserving Bumble Bees. He serves as the Red List Authority for the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) Bumble Bee Specialist Group and has taught bumble bee management and identification courses throughout the U.S. In addition to his work with bumble bees, Rich has investigated native bee pollination in agricultural systems in the Central Valley of California, and studied endangered butterflies in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado and throughout the Pacific Northwest. When not at work, Rich is often off exploring the wonders of the Pacific Northwest with his family.

 

Leif Richardson

Conservation Biologist California Bumble Bee Atlas - The Xerces Society

Leif is a conservation biologist who coordinates the California Bumble Bee Atlas project. His research focuses on the ecology, distribution, and declines of North American bumble bees. Leif previously worked as an environmental consultant, studying pesticide risk to bee pollinators, and as an ecologist for Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. He is co-author of a range of scientific publications on bees, including Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press), the standard reference manual on this group of insects. He is an expert in the inventory and identification of bumble bees, and has extensive experience training others to collect bumble bee distribution data in the field. Leif holds a Master’s degree from the University of Arizona and a PhD from Dartmouth College.

Jun 4
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM PT
Webinar

This workshop will prepare community scientists and agency biologists to participate in the Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas Project. Building on the success and information gathered since 2018, the second phase of this project is focused toward learning more about the rare species in our region: the western bumble bee, Morrison's bumble bee, the Suckely cuckoo bumble bee and Franklin's bumble bee. We also continue to emphasize the importance of long-term monitoring throughout the region. As such, this workshop is for our most seasoned veterans as well as newcomers to this community science project.

Click here for more information and to register.

NOTE: Companion (optional) field trainings in the region (SW WA, Seattle, WA, and Boise, ID) are also available both before and following this online workshop for those interested in a hands-on opportunity to learn the basics of conducting a survey. Please see this page for more information and to register for one of the field events.


Rich Hatfield

Senior Conservation Biologist, Bumble Bee Conservation Lead - The Xerces Society

Rich is a senior conservation biologist for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and has been leading the Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas since 2018. He has authored several publications on bumble bees, including a set of management guidelines entitled Conserving Bumble Bees. He serves as the Red List Authority for the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) Bumble Bee Specialist Group and has taught bumble bee management and identification courses throughout the U.S. In addition to his work with bumble bees, Rich has investigated native bee pollination in agricultural systems in the Central Valley of California, and studied endangered butterflies in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado and throughout the Pacific Northwest. When not at work, Rich is often off exploring the wonders of the Pacific Northwest with his family.

June 7
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM (EDT)
Webinar

Join Stephanie Frischie, Agronomist and Native Plant Materials Specialist with the Xerces Society, for this Women4theLand Conservation Conversation via Zoom.  This conversational webinar will address pollinator habitat, from a few plants in a window box to a butterfly garden, or acres of prairie plants. Whether you’re sowing seeds, purchasing plants from a local seasonal native plant sale, enhancing existing habitat, or taking other steps to support pollinators at home and in your community, we’ll talk through questions, expectations and experiences to learn from each other. 

 

Click here for more information and to register.

 

Stephanie Frischie
Agronomist, Native Plant Materials Specialist

Based in northwest Indiana, Stephanie provides pollinator habitat expertise to farms in Canada and the U.S. She also works with the native seed industry and researchers to plan and develop seed supply of important plant species for restoration of insect habitat. 

June 30
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Webinar

Join Jennifer Hopwood, Xerces Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, as she walks through how to turn your yard into a pollinator haven. Learn about Xerces resources such as plant lists, habitat assessment guides, and landscaping tools. Bring your questions and curiosity.

This is the first webinar in our four-part Bring Back the Pollinators series.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Click here for more information and to register.

Jennifer Hopwood

Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist -The Xerces Society

Jennifer provides resources and training for pollinator and beneficial insect habitat management and restoration in a variety of landscapes. She oversees a team of four USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service partner biologists and works closely with the NRCS. Jennifer has authored a number of publications and articles, and is co-author of several books, including Farming with Native Beneficial Insects, 100 Plants to Feed the Bees, and a roadside revegetation manual. Jennifer has a master's degree in entomology from the University of Kansas. Along with work as a research specialist conducting invertebrate field research and identification, Jennifer was an instructor in biology and environmental science at Iowa State University and Des Moines Area Community College prior to joining Xerces in 2009.

July 21
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Webinar

How can we manage pests while protecting pollinators in home yards? Good garden pollinator habitat requires flowering plants and undisturbed places for pollinators to nest, but home landscapes also need to be protected from pesticides. Join Aaron Anderson, Xerces Pesticide Program Specialist, to touch on a few key pesticide concerns, and talk about alternative methods to reduce pest pressure. In particular, we will learn about some of the common beneficial insects that pollinator plantings can support and how they contribute to pest control.

This is the second webinar in the four-part series Bring Back the Pollinators.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Click here for more information and to register.

Aaron Anderson

Pesticide Program Specialist - The Xerces Society

Aaron Anderson works with the public and Xerces staff to reduce pesticide use in residential landscapes, including promoting alternative pest control measures and pollinator-friendly gardening practices. Prior to joining Xerces in 2022, he researched pollinator conservation in urban landscapes, restored habitat for several endangered butterfly species, and worked in insect biocontrol. In 2021 he was an AAAS Mass Media Fellow at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where he reported science and business stories. Aaron has a PhD from Oregon State University, and outside of work you can probably find him riding his bike, science writing, or fiddling with old cameras.

 

August 25
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Webinar

Join the Xerces Community Engagement team for an exploration of various ways to spread the word about pollinator conservation and how to get your community more involved. See examples of what others have done and learn about Bee City USA, the Pollinator Protection Pledge, and X Kids, a new Xerces program.

This is the third webinar in the four-part series in Bring Back the Pollinators.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Click here for more information and to register.

Matthew Shepherd

Director of Outreach and Education - The Xerces Society

Matthew has worked for the Xerces Society for more than two decades, initially at the vanguard of a new movement to protect pollinators, but then on endangered species and a range of other projects. He is the long-time editor of Wings magazine, and he spent several years leading Xerces' communications effort. His current work is focused on outreach, community engagement, and conservation in towns and cities. Matthew is author of numerous articles and other publications, including Attracting Native Pollinators (Storey Publishing, 2011) and Gardening for Butterflies (Timber Press, 2016).

 

Laura Rost

Bee City USA Coordinator - The Xerces Society

Laura has worked in development and communications for environmental groups since 2005, and has been with the Xerces Society since 2014. She loves to connect with members and share Xerces resources with the public. She holds a bachelor's degree in environmental studies and a certificate in nonprofit management from Southern Oregon University. While at SOU, Laura led the successful student referendum to offset 100% of natural gas and electricity consumed at university facilities through the purchase of renewable energy credits (RECs), making SOU the first public university in the nation to do so. At her home in Milwaukie, Oregon, Laura is converting her yard into pollinator habitat and an urban farm. She volunteers for her local school district’s clothes closet and food bank, and serves on the board of the Milwaukie Pioneer Cemetery.

 

Rachel Dunham

Community Engagement Coordinator - The Xerces Society

Engagement Coordinator, Rachel has built our volunteer program from the ground up and is finding new ways for Xerces to connect to communities. As an Oregonian, she has always loved wildlife and being outdoors. Rachel pursued her passion for nature at Seattle Pacific University, graduating with a bachelor's in ecology, and earning a master's of wildlife conservation from the University of Maine. She spent years traveling between Alaska and Hawaii, working as a naturalist for the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Princess Cruise Lines. Rachel also worked as a research associate in Panama and northern British Columbia. Before Xerces, Rachel worked at the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, managing their public programs. Rachel lives in Missoula, Montana with her husband Chad and their dog Bear. They spend their time hiking, camping, and traveling the world.

September 20
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM (EDT)
Webinar

Join Stephanie Frischie, Agronomist and Native Plant Materials Specialist with the Xerces Society, for this Women4theLand Conservation Conversation via Zoom.  Mid-September can feel like summer or like fall from one day to another. At this learning circle, the panelists will talk about what happened in your pollinator habitat over the summer. They’ll also talk about what is blooming this time of year, which pollinators and insects are active, and what will happen to them in a few months when winter sets in. Join them to learn about providing overwintering habitat and some good books to add to winter reading lists.

 

 

Click here for more information and to register.

 

Stephanie Frischie
Agronomist, Native Plant Materials Specialist

Based in northwest Indiana, Stephanie provides pollinator habitat expertise to farms in Canada and the U.S. She also works with the native seed industry and researchers to plan and develop seed supply of important plant species for restoration of insect habitat. 

September 29
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
Webinar

The availability of nesting habitat is a critical yet often overlooked factor impacting native bee populations. In this webinar, Xerces Biologists, Leif Richardson and Sarah Foltz Jordan, will summarize nesting biology of major groups of bees, including leaf-cutter bees, mining bees, bumble bees, and many more. They will also offer numerous practical approaches to creating and managing nesting habitat features. Approaches are relevant to landscapers, farmers, gardeners, natural resource professionals, and anyone interested in taking the next step in supporting pollinators. Community science opportunities will also be discussed.

This is the fourth webinar in the four-part series Bring Back the Pollinators.

This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.

Click here for more information and to register.

Sarah Foltz Jordan

Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist Habitat Restoration Specialist, Great Lakes Region - The Xerces Society

Based out of central Minnesota, Sarah leads Xerces' upper Midwest native bee and monarch habitat restoration projects, working closely with farmers, agencies, and conservation groups to promote pollinators on farms and in natural areas. Sarah provides habitat restoration support to hundreds of farmers and farm agency professionals across the upper Midwest, with an emphasis on the testing of new, cutting-edge restoration methods on a wide range of fruit, vegetable, and grain farms. Currently she is a member of the Minnesota Governor’s Pollinator Protection Committee, and a consultant on habitat management for at-risk pollinators on public lands in Minnesota. She has authored comprehensive documents about the biology and conservation needs of nearly 200 rare invertebrates, along with numerous pollinator-related fact sheets, guidebooks, and educational tools. Sarah is also an organic apple farmer and is active in the sustainable agriculture community. She holds a master's degree.

 

Leif Richardson

Conservation Biologist California Bumble Bee Atlas - The Xerces Society

Leif is a conservation biologist who coordinates the California Bumble Bee Atlas project. His research focuses on the ecology, distribution, and declines of North American bumble bees. Leif previously worked as an environmental consultant, studying pesticide risk to bee pollinators, and as an ecologist for Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. He is co-author of a range of scientific publications on bees, including Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press), the standard reference manual on this group of insects. He is an expert in the inventory and identification of bumble bees, and has extensive experience training others to collect bumble bee distribution data in the field. Leif holds a Master’s degree from the University of Arizona and a PhD from Dartmouth College.