Pollinator Conservation: Other Publications

General resources on pollinators
These publications are valuable for understanding pollinators and their biology Note: Regional field guides for insects and plants are essential resources, but it is not possible to list publications for all of North America. For field guides and other region-specific information, contact your local library, bookstore, garden store, natural history museum, or wildflower or native plant society. 

Buchmann, S. L., and G. P. Nabhan. 1997. The Forgotten Pollinators. Island Press, Washington, D.C. (An excellent introduction to all aspects of pollinators and pollination. A most highly recommended book and a call-to-arms for pollinator conservation and habitat restoration.)

Kearns, C., and J. Thomson. 2001. The Natural History of Bumblebees. A Sourcebook for Investigations. University Press of Colorado, Boulder, CO. (This slim, highly readable and highly recommended book offers an excellent introduction to bumble bees, covering their biology and conservation, and some research activities.)

O’Toole, C., and A. Raw. 1999. Bees of the World. Blandford, London, U.K. (A comprehensive introduction to bee biology, behaviors, and lifecycles. If you are going to buy one book on bees, this is the one.)

Procter, M., P. Yeo, and A. Lack. 1996. The Natural History of Pollination. Timber Press, Portland, OR. (Probably the best single volume on pollination and plant/pollinator relationships.)

Other books we strongly recommend include C.D. Michener’s magnificent The Bees of the World and J. A. Scott’s The Butterflies of North America, two books with great detail but hefty price tags, and Techniques for Pollination Biologists, by C.A. Kearns and D. Inouye. Full bibliographic information on these books is below.

Biology and conservation of pollinators
Boring, J. K., E. Glasener, G. Keator, J. Knopf, J. Scott, and S. Wasowski. 1995. Natural Gardening. Time Life Books, New York. (This book provides advice on choosing plants for natural gardens; format makes finding information for your region easy.) 

 

Buchmann, S. L., and G. P. Nabhan. 1997. The Forgotten Pollinators. Island Press, Washington, D.C. (An excellent introduction to all aspects of pollinators and pollination. A most highly recommended book and a call-to-arms for pollinator conservation and habitat restoration.)

Cranshaw, W. 1998. Pests of the West. 2nd Edition. Fulcrum Publishing, Golden, CO. (Contains information on prevention and control measures for insect pests for gardens and small farms, including a chapter on the importance of soil to a healthy garden.)

Ellis, B. W., F. M. Bradley, H. Atthowe, and R. Yepsen. 1996. The Organic Gardeners Handbook of Natural Insect and Disease Control. Rodale Press, Inc., Emmaus, PA. (Provides basic information, with entries on more than two hundred plants and their cultivation, soil preparation methods, pests, garden plans, etc.)

Emmel, T. C. 1997. Butterfly Gardening: Creating a Butterfly Haven in Your Garden. Friedman/Fairfax Publishers, New York, NY. (A great introduction to butterfly gardening; full of practical advice.)

Griffin, B. L. 1999. The Orchard Mason Bee. 2nd edition. Knox Cellars Publishing, Bellingham, WA. (A jargon-free book about the blue orchard bee.)

Jackson, B., and V. Baines. 1999. Mindful of Butterflies. The Book Guild, Lewes, U.K. (A beautifully illustrated book that provides comprehensive information on all aspects of gardening for and rearing butterflies.)

Johansen, C. A., and D. F. Meyer. 1990. Pollinator Protection. A Bee & Pesticide Handbook. Wicwas Press, Cheshire. (The authors present information on a highly technical subject in a very readable way.)

Jones, R., and P. Munn (eds.). 1998. Habitat Management For Wild Bees and Wasps. International Bee Research Association, Cardiff, U.K. (A good introduction to various aspects of bee conservation, including a chapter on bee surveys.)

Kearns, C., and J. Thomson. 2001. The Natural History of Bumblebees. A Sourcebook for Investigations. University Press of Colorado, Boulder, CO. (This slim, highly readable and highly recommended book offers an excellent introduction to bumble bees, covering their biology and conservation, and some research activities.)

Matheson, A. (editor). 1994. Forage For Bees In An Agricultural Landscape. International Bee Research Association, Cardiff, U.K. (Advice on how to provide sources of nectar and pollen for bees.)

Matheson, A., S. L. Buchmann, C. O’Toole, P. Westrich, I. H. Williams. (editors) 1996. The Conservation of Bees. Linnean Society Symposium Series, Number 18. Academic Press, Harcourt Brace & Company, London and New York, NY. (An excellent compilation of several papers discussing different components of bee conservation, including the ecological basis for conservation, habitat management, and honey bee competition.)

O’Neill, K. 2001. Solitary Wasps. Behavior and Natural History. Cornell University Press, Ithaca. (An excellent book on solitary wasps, who share many habitat and behavioral traits in common with bees.)

O’Toole, C., and A. Raw. 1999. Bees of the World. Blandford, London, U.K. (A comprehensive introduction to bee biology, behaviors, and lifecycles. If you are going to buy one book on bees, this is it.)

Pesticide Action Network. 2000. Hooked on Poison. Pesticide Use in California, 1991-1998. Pesticide Action Network North America, San Francisco. (This analysis of pesticide use in Californian homes, gardens, and farmland is also available online

Riedl, H., E. Johansen, L. Brewer and J. Barbour. 2006. How to Reduce Bee Poisoning from Pesticides. (This publication discusses methods and techniques to protect bees from hazards associated with pesticide application. Tables provide specific information regarding toxicity of insecticides, miticides and blossom and fruit thinning agents to honey bees; to alfalfa leafcutting bees; to alkali bees; and to bumble bees.). Oregon State University. 25 pages.

Shepherd, M., Buchmann, S., Vaughan, M. and S. Black. 2003. Pollinator Conservation Handbook. The Xerces Society. Portland, Oregon. 145 pages. 57 photographs. (An excellent book on the basic ecology of pollinator insects and how to protect, conserve, or enhance their habitat.)

Xerces Society and Smithsonian Institution. 1998. Butterfly Gardening. Creating Summer Magic in Your Garden. Sierra Club Books, San Francisco, CA. (This book contains detailed advice on all aspects of creating and managing gardens for butterflies, moths, and other beneficial insects; each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert.)

Plant-pollinator relationships
Barth, F. G. 1985. Insects and Flowers. The Biology of a Partnership. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. (A detailed discussion of how insects, mostly honey bees, and flowers are adapted to each other.) 

Bosch, J., and W. Kemp. 2001. How to Manage the Blue Orchard Bee As an Orchard Pollinator. The National Outreach Arm of USDA-SARE, Handbook Series, Book 5., Sustainable Agriculture Network, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD. (A good guide to managing the blue orchard bee-also called the orchard mason bee-as a reliable pollinator.)

Free, J. 1992. Insect Pollination of Cultivated Crops. Academic Press, London, U.K. (Detailed information on the pollination requirements of different crops.)

Delaplane, K. S., and D. F. Mayer. 2000. Crop Pollination by Bees. CAB International, Wallingford, U.K. (Separate chapters cover the biology of different commercially used pollinators, how to achieve effective pollination of crops, and the conservation of bees.)

McGregor, S. E. 1976. Insect Pollination Of Cultivated Crop Plants. USDA Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, Tucson. (A detailed guide to the pollination requirements of a wide range of crops, although somewhat out of date. It can only be read on the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center’s website.

Procter, M., P. Yeo, and A. Lack. 1996. The Natural History of Pollination. Timber Press, Portland, OR. (Probably the best single volume on pollination and plant/pollinator relationships.)

Studying pollinators: Educational ideas, collection, and identification
Bland, R. G., and H. E. Jaques. 1978. How To Know the Insects. McGraw-Hill. (Although first published over half a century ago, this most recent edition is still a good introduction to insect identification.) 

Borror, D. J., and R. E. White. 1998. A Field Guide to Insects. America North of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA. (A comprehensive and easy to follow guide for identifying many commonly seen insects.)

Glassberg, J. 1999. Butterflies Through Binoculars: East. Oxford University Press, New York. (An easy-to-follow photographic guide to butterflies of the Eastern United States.)

Glassberg, J. 2001. Butterflies Through Binoculars: West. Oxford University Press, New York. (A companion volume to Butterflies Through Binoculars: East.)

Imes, R. 1992. The Practical Entomologist. Fireside Books, New York, NY. (An introductory book full of practical information, including on how to collect and rear insects.)

Kearns, C. A., and D. Inouye. 1993. Techniques for Pollination Biologists. University Press of Colorado, Niwot. (Comprehensive guide on how to plan and implement pollination studies, from simple monitoring of flower visits to lab techniques for pollen analysis. Covers basic to advanced methods for capturing insects, removing pollen, covering plants or flowers, cross-pollinating flowers, and making artificial flowers; plus more advanced skills such as pollen analysis and other lab-based studies that may be more appropriate for high school or college students.)

Michener, C. D. 2000. The Bees of the World. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. (If you are serious about bees, this is a book you will want to read. Written by the world’s pre-eminent bee researcher, it includes excellent essays on bee biology and keys that-with practice and a microscope-will enable you to identify any bee to subgenus.)

Michener, C. D., R. J. McGinley, and B. N. Danforth. 1994. The Bee Genera of North and Central America (Hymenoptera:Apoidea). Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. (Written in both English and Spanish, the key is used by experts to identify North American bees to the genus level. It includes a brief note on each genera. This is a fantastic resource, but it takes practice to use it effectively.)

Milne, L. J. 1980. National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects and Spiders of North America. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. (A photographic guide to a wide range of insects.)

Pyle, R. M. 1992. Handbook for Butterfly Watchers. Houghton Mifflin, New York. (An introduction to observing and understanding butterflies, with chapters on gardening and rearing butterflies.)

Schauff, M. E. (editor). Undated. Collecting and Preserving Insects and Mites: Techniques and Tools. USDA Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (Offers detailed guidance on field and lab techniques, this is available online and as a PDF file at www.sel.barc.usda.gov/selhome/collpres/colpres.htm

Scott, J. A. 1986. The Butterflies of North America. A Natural History and Field Guide. Stanford University Press, Stanford. (Nearly two decades old, this book remains one of the best sources of information on the continent’s butterflies.)

Organizations and companies
BioQuip. Specialist supplier of entomological equipment, books, and materials. 

2321 Gladwick Street, Ranch Dominguez, CA 90220

Tel: 310-324-0620. Fax: 310-324-7931 www.bioquip.com

Carolina Biological Supply Company. Supplier of science and educational equipment.

2700 York Road, Burlington, NC 27215

Tel: 800-334-5551 Fax: 800-222-7112 www.carolina.com

Entomo-Logic. Offers technical advice on commercial pollination and supplies blue orchard bees.
21323 232nd St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8982

Tel: 360-863-8547 Email: entomologic@seanet.com

Knox Cellars. Sells blue orchard bees and nesting supplies for these and bumble bees.

1607 Knox Avenue, Bellingham, WA 98225
Tel: 425-898-8802 Fax: 425-898-8070 www.knoxcellars.com

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. This nonprofit center is a great resource for native plant information. Can supply lists of suitable plant species for many areas. Website lists native plant societies across the country.

4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin, TX 78739-1702
Tel: 512-292-4200 Fax: 512-292-4627 www.wildflower.org

Monarch Watch. An educational outreach program of the University of Kansas that promotes the conservation of monarch butterflies and education activities about the fall migration.

University of Kansas, 1200 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045
Tel: 888-TAGGING or 785-864 4441 Fax: 785-864 5321 www.monarchwatch.org

National Gardening Association. Nonprofit that helps gardeners and helps people through gardening.

1100 Dorset Street, South Burlington, VT 05403
Tel: 802-863-5251 www.garden.org

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign. Consortium of conservation groups, government agencies, universities, and private industries from the United States, Mexico, and Canada, who share information and work together for the common good of pollinators.

423 Washington Street, 4th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94111-2339

Tel: 415-362-1137 www.nappc.org

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides. Nonprofit that works to protect people and the environment by advancing healthy solutions to pest problems.

P.O. Box 1393, Eugene OR 97440-1393

Tel: 541-344-5044 www.pesticide.org

Pesticide Action Network North America Nonprofit that works to replace pesticide use with ecologically sound and socially just alternatives.

49 Powell St., Suite 500, San Francisco, CA 94102

Tel: 415-981-1771 www.panna.org

Pollinator Paradise Sells nesting blocks, provides consulting services, and undertakes research on bee conservation and management for agriculture.

31140 Circle Drive, Parma, ID 83660

Tel: 208-722-7808 www.pollinatorparadise.com

USDA Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory website has more suppliers of bees, bee nests and straws, and other pollination supplies www.loganbeelab.usu.edu

Wildlife Habitat Council. Nonprofit that helps large landowners, particularly corporations, manage their unused lands in an ecologically sensitive manner for the benefit of wildlife.

8737 Colesville Road, Suite 800, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Tel: 301-588-8994 www.wildlifehc.org

The Xerces Society. Nonprofit dedicated to preserving the diversity of life through the conservation of invertebrates. Its Pollinator Conservation Program offers practical advice on the conservation of pollinator insects.

628 NE Broadway Ste 200, Portland OR 97232

Tel: 855-232-6639 Fax: 503-233-5794 www.xerces.org

 

Websites

The Xerces Society • 628 NE Broadway Ste 200, Portland OR 97232 USA • tel 855.232.6639 • fax 503.233.6794 • info@xerces.org
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