Recent Xerces Society News

 

Firefly Populations Are Blinking Out

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Blink and you’ll miss them this summer. Around the world, people are reporting that local firefly populations are shrinking or even disappearing. The insect’s dilemma first came to the world’s attention at the 2010 International Firefly Symposium, where researchers from 13 nations presented evidence of firefly population declines and declared “an urgent need for conservation Read more …

 

[VIDEO] Western Bumblebee no longer in Willamette Valley

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Though Oregon may be experiencing a population boom, there is at least one group that is no longer found anywhere in the Willamette Valley. The Western Bumblebee. “Western Bumblebee used to be one of the 3 most common species in Oregon,” said Sarina Jepsen of the Xerces Society in Portland. “It’s really declined dramatically and Read more …

 

Groups seek to protect rare butterfly whose only home is San Juan Island

Monday, June 20th, 2016

San Juan Island is the only home to the island marble butterfly. Populations of the species disappeared from Canadian islands in the 1900’s and were rediscovered on San Juan Island in 1998. The species has suffered further decline since rediscovery and faces limited protections. In the grasslands on south San Juan Island, several patches of Read more …

 

LA Times: 6 easy ways you can help save the bees

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Busy as a bee is an accurate statement. According to the Xerces Society, a nonprofit organization working to protect bees, 75% of the world’s food crop depends on at least one pollinator, such as the honeybee. (California’s pollinator-dependent crop value is about $12 billion a year.) That’s a lot riding on the journey of the Read more …

 

What Santa Monica can do about monarch butterfly decline

Saturday, June 4th, 2016

In 1997 there were more than 1.2 million monarchs overwintering in California and in 2014 only 234,000 – an 81 percent decline from the 1997 high, 48 percent decline from the 18- year average, and just over 10 percent per year. What has caused such a decline? The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, which studies Read more …

 

A common pesticide may be a menace to pollinators. Know how to protect them.

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

Many homeowners want to throw a lifeline to beleaguered bees and butterflies by planting pollinator gardens that will provide sustenance and habitat, but the unwitting use of insecticides may lure these beloved insects to their doom. The worry is that a common type of pesticide known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, will poison honeybees, bumblebees, monarch Read more …

 

Cheerios Giving Bees A Buzz-Worthy 3,300 Acres Of Flowers To Pollinate

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

On April 26, General Mills announced that the farms that supply oats for Honey Nut Cheerios will plant approximately 3,300 acres of habitat for bees and other pollinators by 2020. It’s a size of land that is equivalent to “3,000 football fields,” Tom Rabaey, principal agronomist for General Mills, said in a video for Cheerios. “I Read more …

 

Gardeners can help protect butterfly populations

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Bees aren’t the only pollinators suffering from a massive North American die-off. Butterflies and moths, those flying flowers of the insect world, are disappearing too. “But the situation isn’t hopeless,” says Scott Hoffman Black, executive director of the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, in Portland, Oregon. “Anybody — gardeners or butterfly lovers — can make Read more …

 

This Is What Dessert Would Look Like Without Bees

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Bad news for those with a sweet tooth: the absence of pollinators such as bees and butterflies would signal the end of dessert as we know it. Whole Foods Market recently removed all products from an area of the supermarket reliant on the creatures, mirroring past initiatives in the diary aisle and the produce section. Read more …

 

Maryland legislators enact ban on neonicotinoid pesticides to help bee population

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Maryland lawmakers this week voted to curb the sale of certain pest control products to home gardeners after reviewing studies that point to the harmful effects some lawn chemicals have on bees and other pollinators. The legislation prohibits the retail sale and household use of neonicotinoid pesticides, a class of insect repellent that attacks the Read more …

 

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