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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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Use the search functions to sort by publication type (books, guidelines, fact sheets, etc.), location, and/or subject (agriculture, gardens, pollinators, pesticides, etc.).

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Insectary cover cropping is the practice of growing single species or diverse mixes of broadleaf herbaceous plants and allowing them to bloom to provide pollen and nectar resources that support populations of native bees, honey bees, and the insects that attack crop pests.

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee Campus USA brings college communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee Campus USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your college can join Bee Campus USA.

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee City USA brings communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee City USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your community can join Bee City USA.

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) worked with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to develop this report, which synthesizes the scientific literature and existing best management practices for monarch butterflies along with input from a survey of monarch experts and a survey of EPRI members. Monarch experts were surveyed to identify the relative benefit of specific conservation actions for monarchs as well as to provide opinions on the opportunities for power companies to engage in monarch conservation.

Bee Better Certified™ is the gold standard of pollinator-focused farm certification programs. Developed by the Xerces Society, the world’s largest science-based pollinator conservation organization, Bee Better Certified builds upon nearly two decades of on-farm habitat research and development.
for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects
The plants in this list are recommended for use in pollinator habitat restoration and enhancement projects in urban, rural, natural, and agricultural landscapes in the California Deserts and Southern Nevada.
Donor Newsletter of the Xerces Society
Our twice-yearly update for members, which highlights key Xerces Society projects and current conservation efforts.
Western monarchs need everyone’s help. Starting in 2018, monarch butterflies had tough seasons in their migratory and breeding grounds in the western states and, in the following two winters, the annual Xerces Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count showed that the population hit a new low: In both 2018 and 2019, volunteers counted under 30,000 monarchs—less than 1% of the population’s historic size. This Western Monarch Call to Action, led by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, aims to provide a set of rapid-response conservation actions that, if applied immediately, can help the western monarch population bounce back from its critically low overwintering size.
While habitat degradation, pesticides, and disease all contribute to pollinator decline, climate change is an increasingly significant stressor that may interact with these to further drive the decline of pollinators. A loss of pollinators in the Central Valley will affect both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Farms, natural areas, rights-of-way, and urban spaces can all play a role in making the Central Valley a climate-resilient landscape for pollinators.
The goal of this tool is to evaluate pollinator habitat at a given urban, suburban, or rural site and identify areas for improvement. This process will also help users prioritize the most essential next steps to take for pollinators at the site.