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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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Use the search functions to sort by publication type (books, guidelines, fact sheets, etc.), location, and/or subject (agriculture, gardens, pollinators, pesticides, etc.).

Search publication titles, subtitles, and descriptions for specific words or phrases.
Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee Campus USA brings college communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee Campus USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your college can join Bee Campus USA.

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee City USA brings communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee City USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your community can join Bee City USA.

Native Bees and Your Crops

This brochure provides a summary of the habitat requirements of crop pollinators and where their habitat may be found in the area around a farm.

A Guide to Protecting Our Vital Pollinators

Bumble bees are an essential part of our wildlands, farms, and urban areas, yet many species are suffering alarming population declines. It is critically important to protect these vital pollinators.

There are simple things you can do to protect or create high-quality bumble bee habitat. Typically, these efforts do not involve significant increases in cost or work, but do require increased awareness and attention to the needs of bumble bees. 

This brochure offers an overview of information about how to enhance any landscape to meet the seasonal needs of bumble bees.

A Guide to Saving America’s Butterfly
This brochure contains information about how to enhance any landscape to help meet the seasonal needs of monarchs.
Bee Better Certified™ is the gold standard of pollinator-focused farm certification programs. Developed by the Xerces Society, the world’s largest science-based pollinator conservation organization, Bee Better Certified builds upon nearly two decades of on-farm habitat research and development.
Developed by the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, with support from Oregon Tilth and the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Bee Better Certified works with farmers and food companies to make places that are better for bees and other pollinators. This brochure serves as an informative introduction to the program.
California

This information sheet has details of the plant species included in the California Monarch and Pollinator Habitat Kits, an overview of the habitat kit project, and guidance on how to request a kit.

Insectary cover cropping is the practice of growing single species or diverse mixes of broadleaf herbaceous plants and allowing them to bloom to provide pollen and nectar resources that support populations of native bees, honey bees, and the insects that attack crop pests.

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) worked with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to develop this report, which synthesizes the scientific literature and existing best management practices for monarch butterflies along with input from a survey of monarch experts and a survey of EPRI members. Monarch experts were surveyed to identify the relative benefit of specific conservation actions for monarchs as well as to provide opinions on the opportunities for power companies to engage in monarch conservation.