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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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Use the search functions to sort by publication type (books, guidelines, fact sheets, etc.), location, and/or subject (agriculture, gardens, pollinators, pesticides, etc.).

Search publication titles, subtitles, and descriptions for specific words or phrases.
(U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Conservation recommendations from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for protecting and recovering the western population of monarch. Section 7(a)(1) of the Endangered Species Act directs federal agencies to use their authorities to further the purpose of the ESA, by conducting conservation programs for the benefit of endangered and threatened species. The purpose of these conservation recommendations is to encourage federal agencies to incorporate monarch butterflies into their Environmental Assessments and Biological Assessments associated with Section 7 Biological Opinions.

Essays on Invertebrate Conservation

This year we are celebrating our fiftieth anniversary. Since it was launched in 1971, the Xerces Society has grown to become a widely respected organization, leading the way on the protection of insects and invertebrates in North America and beyond. The articles in this issue reflect our growth and achievements over the last half century.

The Xerces Society Celebrates Fifty Years of Science-Based Conservation, by Scott Black. Page 3.

Pollinators are essential to the health of our environment and for bountiful farm crops. There are four straightforward steps that you can take to help them: grow flowers, provide nest sites, avoid pesticides, and share the word.
Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee Campus USA brings college communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee Campus USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your college can join Bee Campus USA.

Bringing Communities Together to Sustain Pollinators

Bee City USA brings communities together to sustain pollinators by increasing the abundance of native plants, providing nest sites, and reducing the use of pesticides. Affiliates of Bee City USA also work to inspire others to take steps to conserve pollinators through education and outreach. Learn how your community can join Bee City USA.

Native Bees and Your Crops

This brochure provides a summary of the habitat requirements of crop pollinators and where their habitat may be found in the area around a farm.

Las Abejas Nativas y Sus Cosechas

A Spanish translation of the brochure Farming for Pollinators.

Este folleto proporciona un resumen de los requisitos de hábitat de los polinizadores de cultivos y su hábitat se puede encontrar en el área alrededor de una granja.

Habitat for Predators and Parasites
This brochure illustrates how farmers can attract and retain helpful predators and parasites by providing some of the key resources that they require.
A Guide to Protecting Our Vital Pollinators

Bumble bees are an essential part of our wildlands, farms, and urban areas, yet many species are suffering alarming population declines. It is critically important to protect these vital pollinators.

There are simple things you can do to protect or create high-quality bumble bee habitat. Typically, these efforts do not involve significant increases in cost or work, but do require increased awareness and attention to the needs of bumble bees. 

This brochure offers an overview of information about how to enhance any landscape to meet the seasonal needs of bumble bees.