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Publications Library

As a science-based organization, the Xerces Society produces dozens of publications annually, all of which employ the best available research to guide effective conservation efforts. Our publications range from guidelines for land managers, to brochures offering overviews of key concepts related to invertebrate conservation, from books about supporting pollinators in farmland, to region-specific plant lists. We hope that whatever you are seeking—whether it's guidance on making a home or community garden pollinator-friendly, advice on developing a local pesticide reduction strategy, or detailed information on restoring habitat—you will find it here!

 

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Use the search functions to sort by publication type (books, guidelines, fact sheets, etc.), location, and/or subject (agriculture, gardens, pollinators, pesticides, etc.).

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The goal of this tool is to evaluate pollinator habitat at a given urban, suburban, or rural site and identify areas for improvement. This process will also help users prioritize the most essential next steps to take for pollinators at the site.
This fact sheet provides detailed information on hybrid sunflower crop pollinators, including a list of the most important native bees that visit this crop, and steps that can be taken to protect or enhance habitat for these pollinators. The information provided is based on field research conducted by Dr. Claire Kremen (University of California, Berkeley), Dr. Neal Williams and Nikki Nicola.
This fact sheet provides detailed information on watermelon crop pollinators, including a list of the most important native bees that visit this crop, and steps that can be taken to protect or enhance habitat for these pollinators. The information provided is based on field research conducted by Dr. Claire Kremen (University of California, Berkeley), Dr. Neal Williams and Nikki Nicola.
How you can attract and protect beautiful, beneficial insects
Protect and nurture the best-loved of garden guests: butterflies, nature’s kaleidoscopes with wings. The Xerces Society introduces you to a variety of butterflies who need our help, and provides suggestions for native plants to attract them, habitat designs to help them thrive, and garden practices to accommodate all their stages of life.
Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
Attracting Native Pollinators is Illustrated with hundreds of color photographs and dozens of specially created illustrations across four sections: pollinators and pollination, taking action, bees of North America, and creating a pollinator-friendly landscape. Read it for your own enjoyment or use it as a teaching guide to inform others.
Provide a Healthy Habitat to Help Pollinators Thrive
100 Plants to Feed the Bees offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds.
This fact sheet provides detailed information on cherry tomato crop pollinators, including a list of the most important native bees that visit this crop, and steps that can be taken to protect or enhance habitat for these pollinators. The information provided is based on field research conducted by Dr. Claire Kremen (University of California, Berkeley), Dr. Neal Williams and Nikki Nicola.
And what you can do to help
Butterflies, bees, dragonflies, beetles, spiders, mussels, and other invertebrates sustain life as we know it. Yet many are declining due to habitat loss, pesticide use, climate change, and more. This brochure shows how we depend on invertebrates, introduces the major threats facing them, and lists some steps we can all take. No action is too small to help these tiny but vital animals.
Honey Bees in North America
In the face of ongoing reports of pollinator declines, honey bees are frequently the first bee that comes to mind -- yet these bees are not native to North America and their presence in our landscapes add to the threats facing native bees. This fact sheet provides an overview of the research and science about the impacts of the western honey bee, a species that is not native to North America, has on this continent's thousands of species of native bees, and offers steps to take that will help support all bees.
Essays on Invertebrate Conservation
At the core of wildlife conservation is the need to ensure that animals have somewhere to feed, breed, and shelter—that is, habitat. Making that habitat the best it can be may mean balancing many issues, which sometimes include human needs. In this issue of Wings, our writers consider the challenges of light pollution, honey bees in North America, and facilitating agriculture in urban areas.